First inventor to file system under the America Invents Act

First-inventor-to-file system under the America Invents Act

The America Invents Act (“AIA”) was signed into law on September 16, 2011, but different parts of the America Invents Act take effect at different times.  The provisions transitioning the United States from a first-to-invent system to a first-inventor-to-file system become effective March 16, 2013.  However, acts of the inventor before that date may alter the results for patent applications filed after March 16, 2013, as discussed below.

Absolute Novelty

Under the America Invents Act, the general rule is that absolute novelty is required to seek patent protection for an invention.  If the invention is otherwise made available to the public or on sale before the effective filing date of a patent application – anywhere in the world, then no patent protection may be sought for the invention. Under prior law, use or sale in a foreign country did not necessarily invalidate a patent.

Win the race to the Patent Office

Moreover,under the America Invents Act, no patent will be granted to a second inventor to file a patent application if another inventor has already filed a patent application (i.e., first inventor to file) and such patent application matures into a patent or is published.  As such, the first person to win the race to the Patent Office and file a patent application is awarded the patent.

First exception: derivation

The America Invents Act contains two important exceptions to the absolute novelty and first-inventor-to-file rules.  Under the first exception, if (1) the disclosure that bars the inventor from obtaining a patent was made less than one year before the filing of the inventor’s patent application (inventor’s public disclosure) AND (2) the disclosure was made by the inventor or someone who derived the inventive subject matter from the inventor (i.e., derivation), then such disclosure will not be considered as prior art.  Disclosures by the inventor or someone who derived the information from the inventor for the first year will not be used against the inventor.

Second exception: public disclosure exception

Under current USPTO guidance, the second exception is a personal exception.  This means that anything that you as the inventor do cannot be used to prevent you from obtaining a patent.  However, this does not include the activities of others.  If you disclose your invention to others without filing a patent application and another person files a patent application before you based on your idea, then the other person’s activities (e.g., filing or website) could be used against you.  You could use the derivation proceeding to prove the other person derived his/her invention from your activities.  However, due to the expense and unpredictability of the results, I expect most will not pursue the derivation proceeding.

Text of the first-inventor-to-file

Below is the actual text of the first-inventor-to-file section of the AIA.  The AIA is consistent in certain areas but in consistent in others.  It is imperative to consult a patent attorney before implementing a patent protection strategy due to differences in interpretations of the meaning of the AIA, and because courts have not confirmed how the new language is to be interpreted.

§ 102. Conditions for patentability; novelty

(a) NOVELTY; PRIOR ART.—A person shall be entitled to a patent unless—

(1) the claimed invention was patented, described in a printed publication, or in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention; or

(2) the claimed invention was described in a patent issued under section 151, or in an application for patent published or deemed published under section 122(b), in which the patent or application, as the case may be, names another inventor and was effectively filed before the effective filing date of the claimed invention.

(b) EXCEPTIONS.—

(1) DISCLOSURES MADE 1 YEAR OR LESS BEFORE THE EFFECTIVE FILING DATE OF THE CLAIMED INVENTION.—A disclosure made 1 year or less before the effective filing date of a claimed invention shall not be prior art to the claimed invention under subsection (a)(1) if—

(A) the disclosure was made by the inventor or joint inventor or by another who obtained the subject matter disclosed directly or indirectly from the inventor or a joint inventor; or

(B) the subject matter disclosed had, before such disclosure, been publicly disclosed by the inventor or a joint inventor or another who obtained the subject matter disclosed directly or indirectly from the inventor or a joint inventor.

(2) DISCLOSURES APPEARING IN APPLICATIONS AND PATENTS.— A disclosure shall not be prior art to a claimed invention under subsection (a)(2) if—

(A) the subject matter disclosed was obtained directly or indirectly from the inventor or a joint inventor;

(B) the subject matter disclosed had, before such subject matter was effectively filed under subsection (a)(2), been publicly disclosed by the inventor or a joint inventor or another who obtained the subject matter disclosed directly or indirectly from the inventor or a joint inventor; or

(C) the subject matter disclosed and the claimed invention, not later than the effective filing date of the claimed invention, were owned by the same person or subject to an obligation of assignment to the same person.

I invite you to contact me with your patent questions at (949) 433-0900 or James@OCPatentLawyer.com. Please feel free to forward this article to your friends. As an Orange County Patent Lawyer, I serve Orange County, Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego and surrounding cities.

Share to Facebook
Share to Google Plus

Tags: , ,

About the Author

James Yang is a patent attorney whose practice encompasses all areas of intellectual property law including patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets.

Post a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© 2014 James Yang | Terms of Use | Site Map
James Yang is an Orange County patent lawyer and welcomes potential clients throughout California including Orange County, Riverside County, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Ana, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim, Newport Beach, Huntington Beach, Tustin, Brea, Fullerton, Buena Park, Mission Viejo, Lake Forest, Laguna Niguel, Stanton, San Clemente, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Cypress, Laguna Beach, Coto de Caza, Costa Mesa, Aliso Viejo, Ladera Ranch, Dana Point and Foothill Ranch.
Top